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To apply the parable about the blind leading the blind to our own lives.

by Gill O'Neill

Suitable for Key Stage 2

Aims

To apply the parable about 'the blind leading the blind' to our own lives (based on Luke 6.39-40).

Preparation and materials

  • You will need two blindfolds (scarves could be used) and about 10 traffic cones (or PE markers), set out at intervals across the front of the hall. Ensure that there is room for someone to walk in and out of the cones, and that the children in the first row are not too close.
  • Note: It is important to avoid the impression that someone who is blind is not capable of leadership, or will stumble about, unable to find their way. This is stressed in 4. below, where the point is made that children wearing blindfolds are in a very different position from those who live without sight. Blind people learn all sorts of ways of coping and with the help of a stick or a dog they would be able to find their way around the cones.

Assembly

  1. Ask for a volunteer to walk in and out of the cones, without knocking them over or going off course. As you ask, demonstrate yourself by walking in and out of the cones.

    When you have chosen your volunteer, stand them at one end and ask them to begin. When she or he has finished, point out how easily they completed the course.

  2. Ask for another volunteer to do the same. Again, stand the child at the start of the course and tell them to begin. When the child has gone about one third of the way, stop them and explain that you forgot to mention something - that the course must be completed wearing a blindfold.

    Bring the child back to the start and put the blindfold on. Explain that they can stop if it is too difficult for them.

    Set the child off. You will need to walk nearby to ensure their safety. When they go off course, stop them, and remove the blindfold. Ask if they are willing to try again, but this time with a guide.

  3. Choose another child and ask them to be the guide. Blindfold the first child and let them begin together. When they have gone a little way along the course stop them, and say to the guide, Oh, ________, you've forgotten to put your blindfold on! Blindfold the guide and let them continue. You might need the help of another teacher so that you can each look after one blindfolded child. Keep close and stop the exercise when they go off course. Remove both blindfolds.

  4. Ask the first child how they felt doing the course on their own. Was it helpful having the guide with them? Was the guide any help when she/he was also blindfolded? Make the point that children wearing blindfolds are in a very different position from those who live without sight. Blind people learn all sorts of ways of coping and with the help of a stick or a dog they would be able to find their way around the cones.

  5. Say that this is based on a parable - a story that makes a point - that Jesus told and that it applies to us all. It really means that we should not tell other people what to do or how to do something, as we do not always get things right ourselves. Sometimes we can be bossy and show off, but do we always know what we are talking about?

Time for reflection

Dear God,
We all have skills and abilities.
Some things we are very good at,
other things we can do less well.
Help us not to criticize other people, or put them down.
Amen.

Song/music

'Shalom, Shalom' (Come and Praise, 141)

Publication date: April 2002   (Vol.4 No.4)    Published by SPCK, London, UK.
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